MixTape

Kalin has recently posted about her lack of tunage for her trip to Italy.  Who knows what sort of crazy trends they have going on in Europe?  Maybe they all still listen to Joshie or something.  They could be into auto-techno by now, I don’t know.  But we are all speeding away on our computers compiling playlists for her.  It’s easy!

Kind of.

I have talked on this subject before, the demise of the mixtape.  Mixtapes are ancient technology by now.  They were amazing feats of audiology, bringing love or destruction with them.  The challenge was great when making a mixtape, there was a lot more to worry about.  Generally, one made them on an audio stack with a mix of LPs, cassettes, and CDs – if you were lucky.  You had to judge the audio level on many of these and actually listen to the music as it recorded onto the cassette.  A cassette with Two sides.  It can be frustrating enough to clip the CD to match up close to 70 minutes.  If either side of the cassette was off, you could force your listener to a Hell of blank tape for what may have well been eons.

It was from the depths of the eighties mixtapes became vogue.  Their reign lasted well into the late nineties and are still revered in some cultures.  During this period I made several mixtapes.  They were amazingly fun to make and I felt a great sense of accomplishment when they were finished.

I utilized Microsoft Publisher after the end of each compilation to create a tape case label.  Each tape bore the label “Matt’s Tape.”  Followed by some little name I made up.  What I remember – in order – are “Matt’s Tape,”  “Matt’s Tape II,”  “Matt’s Tape:  With a Vengeance,”  “Matt’s Tape:  Revisited,” and “Matt’s Tape:  Protest Contest.”  Each label contained it’s own individually selected clip art.  I’m fairly certain each of these contained several REM and Bob Dylan songs and would no doubt embarress me in public should I be forced to listen to them.  In private though, I would probably rock out.

Those days are gone now and I’m onto the CDs.  Of course, we don’t even need hard copies at all.  Thanks to the power of our electronic world, all anyone really needs to do is post a playlist and allow others to listen to it.  It kind of recreates the “album.”

It’s like everyone can create their own personal “Moulin Rouge” complete with playlist and libretto.  Why aren’t more people doing this?  What a way to write a tale.

“And then Bill looks with lust as Jesse and Veronica walk away.  He looks at the floor and his voice rises in mournful tones, a cover of ‘Jesse’s Girl’ in a minor key.”

Far Out.

Right now, I’m building a playlist to remind Kalin of Summer Camp, which is easy.  The hard part is that I’m sure several people are doing the same, so there will be same song problems with people’s CDs.  BUT we all know that, so we will be trying to throw curveballs at her.  Which will backfire incredibly, I’m sure.

Man, I would love to see the blogosphere erupt into playlist musicals.  What a fun thing that would be to read.  Maybe it’s already been done and I’m on the back row of another trend.  But I stumble a lot, so I don’t know if that would have happened.

In other musical thoughts, has anyone heard the new Fountains of Wayne album?  Is it any good?  I loved Welcome Insterstate Managers.  FOW is a band that knows how to make an album.  Anyone who knows me knows I like albums as opposed to singles surrounded by filler.

That’s another beauty of playlists.  People can take all those one-hits and compile sweet albums with similar themes based upon them.  It’s challenging though, because you don’t want some $5 greatest love songs disc you would find by the binful at the gas station.

That’s all I’ve got.  I need to make a CD.